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Right to Buy Mortgages

Would you like to buy your council property, with a right to buy mortgage, ( RTB ). What a sound decision and fabulous investment this can be, for you where you will be getting some credit for all those years you have been paying rent by purchasing at a brilliant discounted price.

As some of you may have seen recently the discount now available to Council Tenants has been increased to £75,000 from April 2012, to help tenants get their feet on the housing ladder, which is a massive boost for potential buyers.

To add to the good news is we can lend you up to 100% of the purchase price. ,and with the consent of the Local Authority you can borrow additional funds for home improvements at normally a very competitive interest rate due to the lower loan to value that the discounted price will give you.

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More About Right to Buy Mortgages

Do I qualify for a Right to Buy Mortgage.

You’ll only get a discount through Right to Buy if you’ve been a public sector tenant for at least five years. These five years don’t have to be continuous and could have been in different homes with different landlords.

If you are buying jointly with someone else, the discount is based on the person with the most years as a public sector tenant. So if you’ve got ten years as a tenant but your partner has 15, the discount will be based on 15 years.

You’re a public sector tenant if you rent your home from the council or other public bodies like an NHS trust. If you aren’t sure whether your landlord is a public sector landlord, ask them

Maximum discount levels for Right to Buy

There’s a limit to how much money you can get off the value of your property through Right to Buy. The maximum discount across England is £75,000.

How to work out your Right to Buy discount

There are different discount levels for houses and flats.

For houses you get a 35 per cent discount if you’ve been a public sector tenant for five years. This discount increases by 1 per cent for every extra year you’ve been a public sector tenant. No matter how long you’ve been a tenant, the most you can get off your home’s price is 60 per cent.
For flats you get a 50 per cent discount if you’ve been a public sector tenant for five years. This discount increases by 2 per cent for every extra year you’ve been a public sector tenant. No matter how long you’ve been a tenant, the most you can get off your flat’s price is 70 per cent.
For example, if you wanted to buy a flat worth £200,000 and had been a public sector tenant for ten years, you would qualify for a 60 per cent discount (£120,000). However, the maximum discount is £75,000. This means that if the flat was worth £200,000, you could buy it for £125,000.

How the ‘cost floor’ rule affects Right to Buy

Your discount may be reduced by the ‘cost floor’ rule. This rule protects your landlord from losing the money they have spent on repairs and looking after your home in the last 15 years. If they have spent more money than your home is worth, any discount will be reduced. You may not get a discount at all.

Mortgages available for this type of purchase are known as Right to Buy Mortgages. Typically very few lenders offered such mortgages but it has become much more common although it is still classed as a specialist product. These days it is possible to obtain a mortgage to cover up to 100% of the purchase price and also and also to borrow extra for home improvements, with the consent of the Local Authority who will still have an interest in the property for five years.

Paying back the Right to Buy discount when you sell

If you sell your Right to Buy home within five years of owning it, you’ll have to pay back any discount that you got. You’ll have to pay back:

• all of the discount in the first year
• 80 per cent of the discount in the second year
• 60 per cent of the discount in the third year
• 40 per cent of the discount in the fourth year
• 20 per cent of the discount in the fifth year

How much money you have to pay back depends on the value of your home when you sell it.

For example, your home may have been worth £100,000 and you got a 40 per cent discount (£40,000) when you bought it. If you then sold your home in the first year for £110,000, you would have to pay back 40 per cent of £110,000 (£44,000).

You may not have to pay back the discount if you transfer ownership of your home to a member of your family. You will need to agree this first with your landlord and then get a solicitor to do this for you.

If you can’t afford to pay back the discount, eg because the bank is selling your home, you should talk to your landlord. They may not ask you to pay back all of what you owe.